Archive for September 30, 2018

Telegram Messenger Leaks IP Addresses of Users



Dhiraj Mishra, a security researcher from Mumbai, India found that under specific conditions, the Telegram desktop clients for Windows, Mac, and Linux would uncover users' IP address, notwithstanding when the user was configured to protect this data.

Despite the fact that the program describes itself similar to a protected and private correspondence application, yet the researcher has demonstrated that in its default design it would permit a user's IP address to be leaked when making call.

The leak, happening just amid voice calls, happened notwithstanding when the "Peer-to-Peer" connection choice was set to "Nobody." A Peer-to-Peer connection isn't private by outline, as it directly exposes the two participants.

P2P Settings in Telegram for iOS

When utilizing Peer-to-Peer to begin Telegram calls, however, the IP address of the person you are conversing with will show up in the Telegram console logs. Not all forms incorporate a console log. For instance, Windows does not show a console log in their tests, while the Linux variant does.

The Telegram application indicates that users can keep their IP address from being disclosed by changing the setting as doing it will make the user's calls to be steered through Telegram's servers, which would then shroud the IP address, however at the expense of having a slight abatement in sound quality.

Dhiraj, the researcher even shared a Proof of Concept video to BleepingComputer that showed how the IP addresses were leaked. Where he explained about the 3 IP's that leak:

1. Telegram server IP (That's Ok)

2. Your own IP (Even that's okay too)

 3. End user IP (That's not okay)

IP address leak in Telegram console log

The issue since its revelation has been a matter of deep concern that was patched by telegram with the release of Telegram for Desktop v1.4.0 and v1.3.17 beta.

Nevertheless telegram clients who particularly utilize the application for its obscurity highlights are advised to update their desktop clients at the earliest opportunity to patch the bug that has the ability to very easily leak their IP address.

Telegram Messenger Leaks IP Addresses of Users



Dhiraj Mishra, a security researcher from Mumbai, India found that under specific conditions, the Telegram desktop clients for Windows, Mac, and Linux would uncover users' IP address, notwithstanding when the user was configured to protect this data.

Despite the fact that the program describes itself similar to a protected and private correspondence application, yet the researcher has demonstrated that in its default design it would permit a user's IP address to be leaked when making call.

The leak, happening just amid voice calls, happened notwithstanding when the "Peer-to-Peer" connection choice was set to "Nobody." A Peer-to-Peer connection isn't private by outline, as it directly exposes the two participants.

P2P Settings in Telegram for iOS

When utilizing Peer-to-Peer to begin Telegram calls, however, the IP address of the person you are conversing with will show up in the Telegram console logs. Not all forms incorporate a console log. For instance, Windows does not show a console log in their tests, while the Linux variant does.

The Telegram application indicates that users can keep their IP address from being disclosed by changing the setting as doing it will make the user's calls to be steered through Telegram's servers, which would then shroud the IP address, however at the expense of having a slight abatement in sound quality.

Dhiraj, the researcher even shared a Proof of Concept video to BleepingComputer that showed how the IP addresses were leaked. Where he explained about the 3 IP's that leak:

1. Telegram server IP (That's Ok)

2. Your own IP (Even that's okay too)

 3. End user IP (That's not okay)

IP address leak in Telegram console log

The issue since its revelation has been a matter of deep concern that was patched by telegram with the release of Telegram for Desktop v1.4.0 and v1.3.17 beta.

Nevertheless telegram clients who particularly utilize the application for its obscurity highlights are advised to update their desktop clients at the earliest opportunity to patch the bug that has the ability to very easily leak their IP address.

Facebook Admits Using Users’ 2FA Phone Number for ad targeting


The phone number that users enter on Facebook to ensure security via 2FA, which abbreviates for ‘two-factor authentication’, is being used to target them with ads. 2FA, as the name suggests, the method affixes another layer of security to amplify authentication.
In the wake of a report by Gizmodo, which was based on the study conducted by two American Universities, Facebook admitted that it repurposed the phone numbers put onto the platform in the name of 2FA to target advertising. Studies label the phone numbers provided for security reasons as potential fodder for advertisers.
On being inquired about the findings
"We use the information people provide to offer a better, more personalized experience on Facebook, including ads,"  a Facebook spokesperson said in a dialogue with TechCrunch. He further added, "We are clear about how we use the information we collect, including the contact information that people upload or add to their own accounts,"
The pressing claims imposed by the studies prompted the social media giant to respond, it acknowledged channeling the data intended for security purposes in the course of advertising and dollars.
The users who have contact lists uploaded to their Facebook are unwittingly assisting advertisers in laying hands on PII, which is 'Personally Identifying Information' of their contacts.
On the prevention front

Facebook gave a clarification that users can choose not be a target by selecting non-mobile-number based means of 2FA and undoing the synchronization that listed their contacts.

Referencing a spokesperson’s statement, users can manage and delete the contact information they’ve uploaded on the platform at any time.


Facebook Admits Using Users’ 2FA Phone Number for ad targeting


The phone number that users enter on Facebook to ensure security via 2FA, which abbreviates for ‘two-factor authentication’, is being used to target them with ads. 2FA, as the name suggests, the method affixes another layer of security to amplify authentication.
In the wake of a report by Gizmodo, which was based on the study conducted by two American Universities, Facebook admitted that it repurposed the phone numbers put onto the platform in the name of 2FA to target advertising. Studies label the phone numbers provided for security reasons as potential fodder for advertisers.
On being inquired about the findings
"We use the information people provide to offer a better, more personalized experience on Facebook, including ads,"  a Facebook spokesperson said in a dialogue with TechCrunch. He further added, "We are clear about how we use the information we collect, including the contact information that people upload or add to their own accounts,"
The pressing claims imposed by the studies prompted the social media giant to respond, it acknowledged channeling the data intended for security purposes in the course of advertising and dollars.
The users who have contact lists uploaded to their Facebook are unwittingly assisting advertisers in laying hands on PII, which is 'Personally Identifying Information' of their contacts.
On the prevention front

Facebook gave a clarification that users can choose not be a target by selecting non-mobile-number based means of 2FA and undoing the synchronization that listed their contacts.

Referencing a spokesperson’s statement, users can manage and delete the contact information they’ve uploaded on the platform at any time.


Facebook data breach affects 50 Million users



Around 50 million of its users were put into cyber-danger by a mere security shortcoming, according to Facebook.

As per usual, the security breach’s aim was to harvest user’s accounts and to attain power over them. This was the result of a vulnerability exploitation of the “View As” feature, done by the cyber-criminals. The infringement surfaced on Tuesday and the multi-millionaire social-media platform instantly informed the police.

The “View As” privacy function helps a user to see what their profile looks like to other users, especially what information is open to their friends, friends of friends and public. “Access Tokens” are equivalent to digital keys which help the users to stay logged into their accounts.

Numerous bugs in the feature were the pathway for the attackers to steal the access tokens to get into people’s accounts.

The social-networking site’s vice-president of product management said that the fault has been corrected and that all affected plus some other accounts too are being reset to ensure further safeguarding. Also, the possibly affected users were urged to re-login on Friday, without any need to change passwords.

With over 2 billion active monthly users Facebook suffered a great shock when its share price plummeted beyond 3%.
The aforementioned breach would lead the attackers to hack into other accounts of people that use Facebook which comprises sites like Tinder and AirBnB to name a few.

The investigation has started pretty recently, hence which part of the world, those 50 million users come from, is a doubt as of now. If or not the accounts were misused and the information jeopardized is a question that prevails still.

Mark Zuckerberg, the founder and Sheryl Sandberg, the chief operating officer of the platform were surely two of those 50 million preys. The culprit behind all these attacks is still behind the curtain.

It’s getting harder by the days for Facebook to persuade the statesmen and legislators into believing that they can protect their users’ data and with the increasing number of cyber-crime related to this social media platform the trust of the users is wavering.

There is a major requirement for Facebook to take such breaches seriously, tackle them powerfully and contrive plans for any further attacks that could harm the tons of data it possesses.

The only way to ensure the user privacy is limiting the access points for users and mending the features in a way so as to make them work parallel with data safety.

According to sources, attackers are easily captivated by vulnerabilities and hence Facebook turned out to be the intended objective of cyber-crime. People’s privacy and security are of utmost significance and it should stay that way.