Tag Archive for mac

Apple isn’t Happy About the Amount of Mac Malware

 

During testimony defending Apple in a lawsuit with Fortnite developer Epic Games, a top Apple executive said that Mac malware has now surpassed Apple's tolerance level and framed safety as the justification for keeping iPhones locked to the App Store. According to a top Apple executive, this is why Apple must keep iPhone, iPad, and other mobile products behind the App Store's walled garden. 

Craig Federighi, Apple's head of software engineering, told a California court that the existing levels of malware were "unacceptable." "Today, we have a level of malware on the Mac that we don't find acceptable," he stated in response to questions from Apple's lawyers, as ZDNet sister site CNET reports. 

Apple is defending its activities after Epic Games filed a lawsuit in the United States stating because Apple kicked its Fortnight game off the App Store after Epic implemented a direct payment scheme for in-game currency, bypassing Apple's 30% developer fee. Apple, according to Epic, is too restrictive. 

On May 03, the Apple-Epic case began. Phil Schiller, the CEO of the App Store, stated yesterday that the App Store has always prioritized protection and privacy. According to Federighi, 130 different forms of Mac malware have been discovered since May, with one version infecting 300,000 systems. iOS devices can only install applications from Apple's App Store, while Macs can install software from anywhere on the internet. 

Mac malware is already outpacing Windows malware, according to Malwarebytes, a US protection company that offers Mac antivirus. However, the company pointed out that the risks to Macs, which mainly consisted of adware, were not as harmful as malware for Windows. Federighi contrasted the Mac to a car, while iOS was created with children's protection in mind, according to 9to5Mac. 

"The Mac is a car. You can take it off-road if you want and you can drive wherever you want. That's what you wanted to buy. There's a certain level of responsibility required. With iOS, you wanted to buy something where children can operate an iOS device and feel safe doing so. It's really a different product," he stated.

Federighi also said that things would change significantly if Apple allowed iOS users to sideload applications.

Apple isn’t Happy About the Amount of Mac Malware

 

During testimony defending Apple in a lawsuit with Fortnite developer Epic Games, a top Apple executive said that Mac malware has now surpassed Apple's tolerance level and framed safety as the justification for keeping iPhones locked to the App Store. According to a top Apple executive, this is why Apple must keep iPhone, iPad, and other mobile products behind the App Store's walled garden. 

Craig Federighi, Apple's head of software engineering, told a California court that the existing levels of malware were "unacceptable." "Today, we have a level of malware on the Mac that we don't find acceptable," he stated in response to questions from Apple's lawyers, as ZDNet sister site CNET reports. 

Apple is defending its activities after Epic Games filed a lawsuit in the United States stating because Apple kicked its Fortnight game off the App Store after Epic implemented a direct payment scheme for in-game currency, bypassing Apple's 30% developer fee. Apple, according to Epic, is too restrictive. 

On May 03, the Apple-Epic case began. Phil Schiller, the CEO of the App Store, stated yesterday that the App Store has always prioritized protection and privacy. According to Federighi, 130 different forms of Mac malware have been discovered since May, with one version infecting 300,000 systems. iOS devices can only install applications from Apple's App Store, while Macs can install software from anywhere on the internet. 

Mac malware is already outpacing Windows malware, according to Malwarebytes, a US protection company that offers Mac antivirus. However, the company pointed out that the risks to Macs, which mainly consisted of adware, were not as harmful as malware for Windows. Federighi contrasted the Mac to a car, while iOS was created with children's protection in mind, according to 9to5Mac. 

"The Mac is a car. You can take it off-road if you want and you can drive wherever you want. That's what you wanted to buy. There's a certain level of responsibility required. With iOS, you wanted to buy something where children can operate an iOS device and feel safe doing so. It's really a different product," he stated.

Federighi also said that things would change significantly if Apple allowed iOS users to sideload applications.

Apple’s Find My Network: Can be Abused to Leak Secrets Via Passing Devices

 

Apple's Find My network, which is used to track iOS and macOS devices – as well as more recently AirTags and other kits – has been revealed to be a possible espionage tool. 

In brief, passing Apple devices can be used to send data over the air from one location to another, such as a computer on the other side of the world, without the need for any other network connection. 

Using Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) broadcasts and a microcontroller designed to act as a modem, Fabian Bräunlein, co-founder of Positive Security, invented a way to send a limited amount of arbitrary data to Apple's iCloud servers from devices without an internet connection. A Mac application can then download the data from the cloud. He dubbed his proof-of-concept service Send My in a blog post on Wednesday. 

When activated in Apple devices, the Find My network acts as a crowdsourced location-tracking system. Participating devices transmit over BLE to other nearby Apple devices, which then relay data back to Cupertino's servers via their network link. Authorized device owners can then use the company's iCloud-based Find My iPhone or iOS/macOS Find My app to get location reports on enrolled hardware. 

Researchers from Germany's Technical University of Darmstadt – Alexander Heinrich, Milan Stute, Tim Kornhuber, and Matthias Hollick – released an overview of Apple's Find My network's protection and privacy in March, uncovering a few issues along the way. 

Bräunlein's aim was to see if the Find My network could be exploited to send arbitrary data from devices that didn't have access to the internet. "Such a technique could be employed by small sensors in uncontrolled environments to avoid the cost and power consumption of mobile internet," he states. "It could also be interesting for exfiltrating data from Faraday-shielded sites that are occasionally visited by iPhone users." Since he didn't find any rate-limiting mechanism for the number of location reports devices can send over the Find My network, he theorizes that his strategy may be used to deplete smartphone users' data plans. 

With each report being more than 100 bytes, broadcasting a large number of unique public encryption keys as part of the Find My protocol would increase the amount of mobile traffic sent. Bräunlein used an ESP32 microcontroller with OpenHaystack-based firmware to transmit a hardcoded default message and listen for new data on its serial interface for his data exfiltration scheme. These signals will be picked up by nearby Apple devices that have to Find My broadcasting switched on and transferred to Apple's servers. 

In order to satisfy Apple's authentication criteria for accessing location data, obtaining data from a macOS computer necessitates the use of an Apple Mail plugin that runs with elevated privileges. To view the unsanctioned transmission, the user must also install OpenHaystack and run DataFetcher, a macOS app created by Bräunlein.

Hackers Take Advantage of Adobe Zero-Day Vulnerability Impacting Acrobat Reader

 

A patch for Adobe Acrobat, the world's most popular PDF reader, addresses a vulnerability that has been actively exploited and affects both Windows and macOS systems, allowing for arbitrary code execution. 

Adobe is advising customers about a crucial zero-day vulnerability in its widely used Adobe Acrobat PDF reader software that is being actively exploited in the wild. As part of Adobe's Tuesday roundup of 43 fixes for 12 of its products, including Adobe Creative Cloud Desktop Application, Illustrator, InDesign, and Magento, a patch is now available. 

According to Adobe, the CVE-2021-28550 zero-day vulnerability "has been exploited in the wild in selective attacks targeting Adobe Reader users on Windows. Adobe Reader users on Windows may be the only ones that are currently being targeted. The bug, however, affects eight different versions of the software, including those for Windows and Mac. The versions include:

1.Windows Acrobat DC & Reader DC (versions 2021.001.20150 and earlier) 
2.macOS Acrobat DC & Reader DC (versions 2021.001.20149 and earlier) 
3.Windows & macOS Acrobat 2020 & Acrobat Reader 2020 (2020.001.30020 and earlier versions)
4.Windows & macOS Acrobat 2017 & Acrobat Reader 2017 (2017.011.30194  and earlier versions)

Adobe did not have any technical details about the zero-day flaw. Those details are usually available after users have had a chance to apply the patch. Users can manually update their product installations by going to Help > Check for Updates, according to Adobe's May security bulletin, which was released on Tuesday. 

Several other important bugs were included in Tuesday's roundup of 43 fixes. Adobe Acrobat received a total of ten crucial and four significant vulnerability patches. A total of seven of the bugs were arbitrary code execution bugs. Three of the vulnerabilities patched on Tuesday (CVE-2021-21044, CVE-2021-21038, and CVE-2021-21086) expose systems to out-of-bounds write attacks. 

On Tuesday, Adobe Illustrator got the highest number of patches, with five critical code execution vulnerabilities patched. Three of the flaws (CVE-2021-21103, CVE-2021-21104, and CVE-2021-21105), according to Adobe's definition, are memory corruption bugs that enable hackers to execute arbitrary code on targeted systems. The three memory corruption bugs were discovered by Kushal Arvind Shah, a bug-hunter with Fortinet's FortiGuard Labs.

how to turn off Auto-correct in iphone /ipad

iphone-settings-home-screen-icon

Turn Off Autocorrect in iPhone

Autocorrect is a great iPhone feature if you text and/or email a lot. The ability to quickly type and have the smartphone complete words for you or correct grammatical mistakes helps write efficiently and quickly. Although autocorrect feature is great, it still doesn’t understand some local words and might get in the way of writing personal texts and emails especially when you are used to using certain phrases and words

1. Open Settings

2. Choose General to see some of the most common statistics about your Apple iPhone and view important options.

iPhone Settings
iPhone Settings
3. Tap the Keyboard option to get to the Keyboard settings and turn off autocorrect in iPhone
iPhone General Settings
iPhone General Settings

4. This will show you the current status of all the Keyboard settings.

iPhone Keyboard Settings

iPhone Keyboard Settings

5. To turn off autocorrect in iPhone,  toggle the Auto-Correction status from ON to OFF. You have now turned off autocorrect in iPhone.

Turn Off Autocorrect in iPhone

Turn Off Autocorrect in iPhone