Tag Archive for privacy

Security Experts listed who responsible for leaking your data to scammers

"There are three most common types of data leakage," said Vseslav Solenik, Director of the R-Vision Center of Expertise.

Personal data of Russians become available to fraudsters due to the negligence of employees and partners of companies, hacking of IT structures of organizations, or due to the carelessness of the citizens themselves.

Mr. Solenik stressed that in most cases, data leakage is illegal. Often, scammers find out personal data from the people themselves, promising them profitable bonus programs.

"Fraudsters attract them with various bonus programs, favorable offers and other things. And in exchange, the attackers receive a full set of personal data," the expert added.

The specifics of the Russian legislation is that even when transferring the full name and phone number of the company, the subject is obliged to fill out the consent form prescribed by law, where he is forced to specify his passport data, registration address and other information that can be used later by fraudsters.

"At the same time, it is impossible to fully protect your personal data from fraudsters today. You can only observe the hygiene of information security, raise your awareness to resist phishing and attacks, be vigilant and refuse to transfer personal data in exchange for minor services from dubious companies," the expert stressed.

Solenik added that it is equally important to know the current legislation. He called on the Russians to defend their rights in the field of personal data processing: to report incidents of leakage to the regulator and to seek the responsibility of companies for this.

Earlier, the majority of Russians supported the introduction of amendments to the law on personal data. Thus, 62 percent consider it necessary to be able to withdraw consent to the use of their personal information. In this case, Internet services will have to delete it within three days.

Every fifth child faced with malware and adult content

Experts analyzed how often children encounter cyber incidents in the online space. It turned out that every fifth child has at least once encountered malware and viruses. Also (in 19% of cases), children come across unwanted content "for adults". In 18% of cases, children's social media accounts were hacked or attempted, and 15% of parents also reported that suspicious strangers wrote to their child.

Parents also noted that children make unconscious or uncoordinated spending on the Internet: they subscribe to paid services or buy access to online games. Parents whose children bought something on the Internet said that in most cases (81%) the purchase amount was up to 1 thousand rubles ($14).

“Parents need to abandon online wallets and cash and make a separate bank card for the child in order to protect the family from unwanted spending. This can be a virtual account or an additional card to your own. The fact is that openly criminal websites and services on the Internet do not accept bank cards for payment. In addition, adults have access to the limits and settings of the children's card, and they can always challenge unwanted spending in the bank and save the family budget," said Alexey Govyadov, head of analytics and automation at ESET in Russia.

Cyber threats that children most often face online: malware (viruses, etc.); unwanted content 18+; hacking or attempted hacking of a page in social networks; suspicious strangers wrote to the child; unconscious or uncoordinated spending; the child was in suspicious groups or communities.

Speaking about child safety on the Internet, half of the parents surveyed say that their child knows that in the event of a cyber incident, they should immediately contact adults. More than a third of the respondents also noted that their child knows safe sites and applications, and also makes online payments only on trusted resources.

‘Vigilante Malware’ Blocks Users From Downloading Pirated Software

 

Scientists have unearthed one of the most abnormal findings in the malware chronicles. It is a booby trap file that attempts to make the downloader a mouse and try to prevent future unauthorized downloads. 

Andrew Brandt, Sophos Labs Principal Investigator named the malware ‘Vigilante’. When the victim downloads and runs what appears to be pirated software or games, it gets installed. Behind the scenes, the malware reports the filename that was executed to an attacker-controlled server, along with the IP address of the victims’ computers. Lastly, Vigilante attempts to modify the victim’s computer to make piratebay.com and 1,000 other pirate sites inaccessible.

As web servers normally log a visitor's IP address, the hacker now has the access to both the pirate's IP address and the name of the software or movie that the victim attempted to use. While it is unknown what this information is used for, the attackers could share it with ISPs, copyright agencies, or even law enforcement agencies. 

“It’s really unusual to see something like this because there’s normally just one motive behind most malware: stealing stuff. Whether that’s passwords, or keystrokes, or cookies, or intellectual property, or access, or even CPU cycles to mine cryptocurrency, theft is the motive. But not in this case. These samples really only did a few things, none of which fit the typical motive for malware criminals,” Brandt explained. 

Vigilante updates files on infected computers and hijacks them from connecting to The Pirate Bay and other Internet destinations known to be used by people who trade pirated software. Brandt has discovered some of the Trojans lurking in software packages available for Discord-hosted chat services. He found others disguised as popular games, productivity tools, and security products available through BitTorrent. 

“Pading an archive with a purposeless file of random length is an easy way to change the hash value of the archive. Filling it with a racist slur taught me everything I needed to know about its creator,” Brandt wrote on Twitter. 

Since Vigilante does not have a persistence technique, it means it has no solution to stay put in. Users who have been infected only want to edit their Hosts files to be disinfected. There are other strange things – Many Trojanized executable files are digitally signed using fake code signing tools. The signature contains a randomly generated 18-character uppercase and lowercase.

The opposition has filed a lawsuit against Roskomnadzor on the illegality of slowing down Twitter in Russia


 The head of the Moscow municipal district Krasnoselsky Ilya Yashin, opposition leader Yevgeny Domozhirov, photographer Yevgeny Feldman and the capital's municipal deputy Vadim Korovin filed a class-action lawsuit against Roskomnadzor in connection with the Twitter slowdown. The plaintiffs claim that they themselves did not violate the laws, and believe that the measures of Roskomnadzor violate their rights

The plaintiffs ask the court to oblige Roskomnazdor to "stop using centralized response measures in the form of slowing down the speed and other restrictions on Twitter", and also to oblige the department "to exclude the service from the list of threats to the stability, security and integrity of the functioning of the Internet and the public communication network on the territory of the Russian Federation." According to the lawyer representing the plaintiffs, Stanislav Seleznev, the lawsuit was filed in the Tagansky Court of Moscow.

The plaintiffs claim that they "never published illegal content, did not call for violence, did not justify violence or discrimination." The lawsuit notes that the applicants were not in any way connected to the account owners responsible for posting allegedly prohibited information on Twitter. According to the lawyer, "the rights of each of the plaintiffs are largely affected by the applicable restrictions since the publication of media files is a significant part of their communication with the audience."

According to the statement of claim, interference in the normal functioning of the Twitter service by Roskomnadzor in the form of slowing down access to the entire service for all users throughout the Russian Federation constitutes an interference with the right of administrative plaintiffs to freely express their opinion.

On March 10, Roskomnadzor began to slow down access to Twitter on 100% of mobile devices and 50% of desktop devices. Roskomnadzor threatened Twitter that the social network will be blocked for a month if it does not delete posts with prohibited information. At the end of May, Roskomnadzor announced its decision not to block Twitter, as the moderators of the social network deleted more than 91% of the prohibited information. The department promised to partially remove the speed limit of Twitter.

It should be noted that earlier, Twitter has been fined almost 28 million rubles ($386.500) in Russia for not deleting illegal content according to court decisions.

WhatsApp’s New Privacy Policy: A Quick Look

 



With the advent of its latest privacy policy, the Facebook-owned messaging app is all set to block certain features if the users won't agree to the new privacy policy.

The update that was initially set to be rolled out by February 8 – making new privacy regulations applicable for all its users, got delayed till May 15 as WhatsApp faced strong contempt from the public, which allowed its competitors namely Telegram and Signal to solidify their repute with the public.

Earlier, as per the ultimatum given by WhatsApp: if the users do not accept the updated privacy policy on May 15, they won't be able to use the app. However, later on, it was said that no accounts will be deleted in case the aforementioned does not happen. 

Giving insights into the new Privacy Policy, a WhatsApp spokesperson said, “Requiring messaging apps to “trace” chats is the equivalent of asking us to keep a fingerprint of every single message sent on WhatsApp, which would break end-to-end encryption and fundamentally undermines people’s right to privacy.”

“We have consistently joined civil society and experts around the world in opposing requirements that would violate the privacy of our users. In the meantime, we will also continue to engage with the Government of India on practical solutions aimed at keeping people safe, including responding to valid legal requests for the information available to us,” the Spokesperson added.

WhatsApp told that it is not imposing its new policy on the users and that they are free to not do so. However, it might involve users deleting their WhatsApp account on their own as the other option than to accept the 2021 update, because they won't be able to access their chat lists or call their contacts via WhatsApp. 

As per WhatsApp's statements, we can deduce that whenever users will access the app, they will be constantly reminded to accept the updated privacy policy to access all its features – eventually making the platform more or less unserviceable to them. 

The users who do accept the updated privacy policy won't witness any key changes in their experience, however, those who continue to have the app installed on their device without accepting the new policy might eventually end up saying goodbye to the app due to its limited serviceability or “inactivity”.